Colloquium: Acoustical Imaging with higher-order scattering

Date: 5 February 2018

Time: 4pm The Cyprus Institute

Venue: GOB Seminar room

Speaker: Dirk J. (Eric) Verschuur, Program director of the Delphi research consortium

Abstract:

Acoustical imaging has applications in many fields, like seismic imaging of the Earth subsurface structures and medical imaging inside the human body. Traditionally, these imaging techniques are based on the single-scattering assumption: reflected waves from a certain acoustic source are measured with receivers, from which the image of the contrasts can be generated. However, in reality the acoustic waves will follow more complex, multi-scattering paths. These arrivals are usually neglected in imaging and create artifacts. However, by including the multi-scattering wave paths in the imaging process a two-fold benefit is achieved: a reduction of artifacts and an increase in illumination and  resolution of the medium. This means that traditional imaging is replaced by a full wavefield inversion process. Examples are shown for medical and seismic imaging.

About the speaker:

Dirk J. (Eric) Verschuur (1964) received his M.Sc. degree in 1986 and his Ph.D degree (honors) in 1991 from Delft University of Technology (DUT), both in applied physics. After 5 years of research fellowship, in 1997 he became assistant professor and since 1999 he is an associate professor at the DUT at the Laboratory of Acoustical Wavefield Imaging within the ImPhys department. Since 2016 he is the Program director of the Delphi research consortium (which is sponsored by 29 companies from the oil and gas industry), within which research is carried in the area of Geo-Imaging. His main interests are wavefield modeling, data processing, imaging and inversion techniques. In 1997 he received SEG’s J. Clarence Karcher award and in 2006 he was awarded with the Virgil Kauffman Gold medal from the SEG. He has been selected as the EAGE lecturer for the Education tour 2006 with a one-day course on multiple removal. He has been co-promoter of more than 20 successfully completed Ph.D. theses at Delft University of Technology since 1997.